FILM: IN PRODUCTION

INDIAN POINT

NOWHERE LEFT TO HIDE

According to experts who for decades have been studying the risk of having a nuclear plant – and the 2000 tons of radioactive waste it has already produced, housed in underprotected warehouses – located in the midst of 20 million people was a mistake from the very beginning.

INDIAN POINT: NOWHERE LEFT TO HIDE

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n New York we were able to successfully ban hydraulic-fracturing for gas and oil but to-date, despite that Governor Andrew Cuomo is on the same page, the aging nuclear plant at Indian Point remains online. A decision to close it, or extend its license, is expected any month.

In 2015 alone the sole remaining reactor has been shut down five times, due to fires, leaks and transformer failures. It is not fear mongering to suggest that one day one of these “emergencies” is going to involve a radioactive leak. If/when that happens, where exactly will those 20 million neighbors go? According to emergency first responders, the answer lies with the winds. It will be the direction of the wind that day that will dictate who will be safe, and who will not be.

The plant’s owners have come up with a plan, in cooperation with Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office and the environmental group Riverkeeper, to close Indian Point as soon as 2021. Which is a good thing. But it doesn’t solve some of the biggest environmental risks created by an aging nuclear power plant. What will happen, most importantly, to all those highly-radioactive spent fuel rods, currently still “alive” in the bowels of the facility? What will happen to the local economy when the plant shuts down? Where will the necessary energy needed to replace the nuclear power come from?

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Indian Point: Nowhere Left to Hide

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