2008 FILM

WHAT WOULD DARWIN THINK?

MAN VS. NATURE IN THE GALAPAGOS

Though most of the Galapagos Islands are off-limits to tourism, man’s heavy footprint is being felt as thousands move there to try and cash in on the tourist boom. Illegal fishing, homesteading and increased pressure on a fragile environment are the results. What would Charles Darwin think?

WHAT WOULD DARWIN THINK?

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fter Charles Darwin first visited the island archipelago of Galapagos in 1839, it took him another twenty years to decipher the scene he’d witnessed, the most perfectly preserved biodiversity on the planet. His theory of evolution – published 150 years ago – pulled back the curtain on a debate that had been simmering for years, and still percolates.

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Today, Darwin would be surprised by the tourist mecca Galapagos has become; 200,000 visitors a year, 40,000 permanent residents. The impact on the most unique collection of endemic wildlife in the world has been heavy; too many people bringing too many of their ways (and invasive species) from the outside world threatening the future of this one-of-a-kind place. What would Darwin think of how Galapagos has evolved in the twenty-first century?

We think he would be shocked and dismayed by what’s transpired in the Galapagos since his first visit.

It’s not the boom in tourism that threatens the island state, rather the desire of many to profit from it. Tourism is pretty well managed through the islands, but each year more residents of the mainland try to make the Galapagos home, putting heavy pressure on a place to support homes, cars, pet dogs and cats … and the local economy necessary to keep these new residents alive.

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What Would Darwin Think: Man vs Nature in the Galapagos

Produced and Directed by Jon Bowermaster
Written by Jon Bowermaster and Chris Cavanagh
Edited by Chris Cavanagh
Executive Producers Mark Terk and Dawn Porter
Videography Alex Nicks

Produced and Directed by Jon Bowermaster
Written by Jon Bowermaster and Chris Cavanagh
Edited by Chris Cavanagh
Executive Producers Mark Terk and Dawn Porter
Videography Alex Nicks

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